Punctuating Poems

Punctuation marks are important in poetry,
just as in any other work of literature,
for without them, a poem may just be blurry
and as tasteless as ditch water.
So, let’s punctuate our poems, dear poets.

Use the comma to introduce a pause,
to emphasize a particular phrase or word,
and as a surrogate for “and” in a clause;
when one thought is expressed in two or more lines
without any punctuations, the lines are
called run-ons:
meaning they’re read together as one line.

Use a full-stop to introduce a long pause.
That means the end of a thought for any cause.
Don’t you use question marks to introduce a querry?
For anythings that sounds quite amazing or scary,
what an imprudent thing it is not to use an exclamation mark!

Should you want to make a thought contrasting
the one on the previous line of your writing,
use a semicolon;
however, should the next sentence be expounding on
the previous one, use a full colon:
it is a punctuation mark with two dots, up and down,
and is also used to introduce a list of items.

“Quotation marks must not be forgotten
when writing direct speeches any often,”
said my teacher of English.
“Place them properly, not as you wish.”
The hyphens, the ellipsis marks… not be misused.
All of these and many more have their meaning
when in a poem they are appropriately used,
or even in any ‘peace’ of writing.

So, dear poets, let’s punctuate our works
to make the meaning clearer,
and to give our readers a time easier
when going through our great works.

Β© Laminsaindies

30 Comments

  1. johncoyote says:

    I agree. Punctuating the poem. Give balance and direction. New writers use capital letters. Leave the reader confused.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Lamittan Minsah says:

      Wow, thanks for your compliment. I agree. πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’•

      Liked by 2 people

      1. johncoyote says:

        Hello Lamittan and you welcome.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Lamittan Minsah says:

        Pleasure πŸ’–πŸ’–

        Liked by 2 people

  2. Wonderful. Great tip

    Like

    1. Thanks, my friend Michael. πŸ’–πŸ’–

      Like

      1. 🀝🀝❀

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Lamittan Minsah says:

      Thank you so much my friend πŸ’–πŸ’–β€

      Like

  3. oh I loved this Lamittan. Truth be told.. I am always confused as to what and how to use them. And when I’m on twitter which is almost never but intending to, all characters count. Oh my, such a dilemma! πŸ’–πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ€£πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Mmm… thanks for your compliment, dear. Now at least you know. Punctuation marks are important in all writings. πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–

      Liked by 1 person

      1. totally but not for Twitter cuz they count in characters πŸ€·β€β™€οΈlol

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Oh, i understand now πŸ˜…. It’s good to know. Thanks again.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Indeed!!! πŸ’–

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Beril Atieno says:

    I totally agree with you, punctuating the poem correctly makes it look neat and easily readable.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Very true. Thank you so much, dear. πŸ’–πŸ’–

      Like

  5. Oh yes, I agree. However, I did have a showdown with an editor about the use of the Oxford comma in a poem of mine. I use British English, so do not use the Oxford comma , she was American and insisted on it. To me, it make my poem read very badly.

    So I took all the punctuation out of the poem — it was a short poem and didn’t suffer too badly……

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Such a great piece of advice. I agree that while some publications insist on the use of the oxford comma, others do not like it at all, either because of their in-house styles or quality of the output. But the latter is more realistic to me and I’m glad to get it now from a poet’s mouth out of experience. Thanks for enlightening us, dear. πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’•πŸ’

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I don’t do Oxford comma. Use of a comma like that was punished with demerits when I was at school!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Great, glad to know.

        Like

  6. Daphny Aqua says:

    Quite an interesting and informative one on punctuation marks, totally agree with you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks a lot for your emphasis, Daphny my friend. Glad you liked it. πŸ’–πŸ’–

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Daphny Aqua says:

        You’re very much welcome, you made learning punctuations so much fun. πŸ™‚πŸ’–

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Wow, I did? What a heart-warming comment, my dear Daphny. πŸ’–πŸ’– Thank you so much. Your presence here is highly valued.

        Like

      3. Daphny Aqua says:

        Of course you did, you’re most welcome dear ❀️
        Aww.. how sweet of you to say that. 😊🌸

        Liked by 1 person

      4. You’re most welcome, dear πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’•πŸ’

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Daphny Aqua says:

        😊❀️🌸🌸

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Leon Stevens says:

    Well penned to get your point across. I do think that punctuation in poetry is a personal choice. As an art form, there needs to be some artistic license, otherwise you are just writing prose.
    For me, the end of a line can either be a full stop or a pause, so I tend not to use periods/commas unless I I think that it makes the meaning clearer. Often, I’ll indent an uncapitalized line if I want the reader to know it is a connected to the previous.
    As with the painter, It all comes down to the poet to choose the colors to use.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I love this β€πŸ’– It’s true that it’s a world of choice, and what applies to one may not apply to another. Thanks for bringing your opinion on board. When writers deliberate like this, we get to know better and choose from a variety. I’m pleased with your comment, my friend Leon. Thanks for keeping in touch. πŸ’•πŸ’–β€

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Such a clever poem!

    Like

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