Boxed

I was both the coolest and strictest pupil in school.

Yeey!πŸ˜ƒ The weekend’s here, everybody! As always, it’s time to eat and drink 🍹πŸ₯‚πŸ»πŸœπŸ±πŸ› and take ourselves on a little tour to the moon πŸŒ•. Let’s go. 🌜 πŸ§‘β€πŸ¦―πŸ‘¨β€πŸ¦ΌπŸƒβ€β™€οΈπŸƒ.

Today, I thought about some primary school intrigue as I sat chatting with a friend. I love journaling my childhood memories so that, Godwilling, my kids may refer to them one day.

I have to admit that I was quite a pesky kid growing up, not pesky in the way of discipline (oh I was a very disciplined kid growing up πŸ˜€) but pesky in terms of how I related with fellow kids.

Because of my “softness” and integrity (ain’t putting my manners on a plinth πŸ˜†πŸ˜…πŸ€£), my teachers appointed me a prefect in class three. I was made the class prefect.

Prefecting those days entailed enforcing discipline among fellow students. Our main role was, therefore, to identify lawbreakers and report them to the class-teachers or teachers on duty for disciplining. We were also allowed to impose light punishments in cases where the offense committed was not so glaring and grievous.

Personally, I was an iron hand in a velvet glove, and I knew it. My teachers knew me as the softest and politest boy in school, but my classmates knew the other ruthless side of me. Perhaps you’re now wondering what it was. Well, this is it: I loathed, and I mean loathed, noisemaking during class.

So, incited by a female desk-mate, or desky as we often called them, I’d constantly write down the names of prattleboxes and take the lists to the class-teacher who would, in turn, punish them. And this, is what my fellow pupils detested. They wanted to have their own freedom, to tell stories as loud and as much as they wanted, in the absence of a teacher of course. Oh baby, I wouldn’t allow that!🀣 Not the Lamittan I know.

Learning in silence was fun, and noisemaking wasn’t going to spoil it. πŸ˜€

The boys were irked by this state of affairs, and so I was boxed. Boxed was a slang we used to refer to a situation where one was considered awaiting punishment by fellow pupils on the school closing day. Closing days at the end of every term were ideal for fighting because no one would report you to the teachers, unless at the onset of the new term, a month later, which was a rare case. I swear, though, that I didn’t know a darn thing about I being boxed.

Towards the end of the term, after sitting the exams, I began hearing rumours that the boys were planning to go hunting after closing (it was unusual but acceptable since after school, everyone went their way). I heard that all the boys were to go. When I discovered that it was a plan spearheaded by Shem, a hefty and boor mannered boy who was also a notorious noisemaker, I began to smell a rat.

Then finally came the closing day. There was a raft change of plans. All students were out playing pastimes at the playground and around classrooms. I was with my fellow prefects at the closing arena, in the accompaniment of a group of other students too, watching as different groups planned their presentations, when I was summoned. A boy came running for me nearly breaking a knee. His names was John, and he was rather short and tiny – suitable for those sorts of dirty errands πŸ˜†πŸ€£.

“Lam,” he called. “You’re needed at the gate. One of our classmates has been hurt and your inspection and help is required.”

“Who’s that and what has happened?” I managed to ask, feeling a bit nervous.

“It’s… wouldn’t you just come and see for yourself? We’re just a few.” He looked anxious too and this, perhaps, was what made me give in to his treachery. I would later learn that this was a means of getting me out of school for the punishment.

When we arrived at the gate, I met a group of angry-looking boys, each carrying a cane and ready to cast their irritation on me. Shem was amongst them. “Let’s not do it here, bwana (mates),” he cautioned the boys. “This is close to school and chances are we could be seen. Let’s carry him away into the forest, tie him up with a rope and lash him.” πŸ™€πŸ˜Ώ

The other boys agreed. And they were just about to grab and carry me away when the bell rang – blessed Christ! All I heard was an “ooooh” from the gang as we scattered and ran back to school to assemble at the arena for the closing session.

🌷🌷🌷

It’s weekend. Have some fun.πŸ€—

52 Comments

  1. Sadje says:

    Lucky escape.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Sadje πŸŒŸπŸŒŸπŸ’•

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sadje says:

        Kids don’t forgive tattletales. I hope you managed to stay safe from their revenge?

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Hahah. I was hurt for some time, but I managed to overcome my emotions and keep my integrity in tact. It was a great step in learning the kind of people I associated with. πŸ’•πŸŒŸπŸŒŸπŸ’•

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Sadje says:

        Very brave of you my friend. Especially at such a young age. πŸ‘πŸΌπŸ‘ŒπŸΌ

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Indeed that was a brave take. Since then I’ve always been careful about my relation with people. 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Sadje says:

        A valuable lesson learned.

        Liked by 1 person

      6. Indeed. Well appreciated. Many thanks, dear. 😘

        Liked by 1 person

      7. Sadje says:

        πŸ‘πŸΌ

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Very interesting story, Lamittan. Truly enjoyed. Glad you were rescued by the bell.πŸ’•

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, the bell did come to my rescue. I’m glad you enjoyed reading and left such a kind comment. Thanks, Grace. πŸ’•πŸŒŸπŸŒŸπŸ’•πŸ™

      Liked by 1 person

      1. My pleasure .πŸ’•

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Jeff Flesch says:

    A lovely reflection, Lam. Reminds me of my grade school days. Glad you got away. Blessings to you on a blissful weekend. πŸ’–

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Aw, thank you so much Jeff. It is so wonderful to come by your kind compliment, my friend. I’m certainly happy you liked it. πŸ’•πŸ’–

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Jeff Flesch says:

        You’re most welcome, dear Lamittan. Always. I loved it, dear friend. πŸ’–πŸ’–

        Liked by 1 person

      2. The pleasure is all mine πŸ’•πŸŒŸπŸŒŸπŸ’•πŸ’–

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Jaya Avendel says:

    An interesting story to be sure and one that vividly comes to life with a roar!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you many times, Jaya. πŸ’•πŸŒŸπŸŒŸπŸ’•

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Wic says:

    I’m thinking you would have been reporting meπŸ₯Ί School days! Great story to bring back memories

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So you were also a terrible noisemaker, Wic? πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ I can’t help laughing. Those times are worth recalling indeed. Thanks for your wonderful comment, my friend. πŸ’•

      Like

    2. Jane Aguiar says:

      Beautiful reflection of those (golden) days of childhood. I was also a noise maker in the classroom. I was a Tom boy with boycut hair.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I’m glad you escaped the thrashing! πŸ˜… Great story!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, I did πŸ˜‚. Thanks for reading and writing such a kind comment, dear Shruthi. And thanks for your following too. 😊 πŸ’–πŸ’ž

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Absolutely my pleasure! πŸ’–

        Liked by 1 person

      2. πŸ’•πŸŒŸπŸŒŸπŸ’•πŸ’š

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Eugenia says:

    What an interesting reflection on your childhood and saved by the bell, for sure. Those formidable years are worth remembering. πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes they are, my friend Eugi. I’m happy you enjoyed. Many thanks to you. πŸ’šπŸ’•πŸŒŸπŸ’•

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Eugenia says:

        My pleasure, Lamittan! 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      2. πŸ’žπŸ’šπŸ’ž

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Daphny Aqua says:

    I could actually picture the whole story haha… That was such a lucky escape you had, wish teachers would look more into this sort of things as for some it can cause a long time trauma. πŸ’–πŸ’–

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It was quite traumatizing but the holidays were approaching and there was nothing I could. Besides Shem and his group were sore-headed. If I took action and they were punished, they could now even actually organise and do a more painful evil mission. They were just a terrible lot of pupils. πŸ’•πŸ’šπŸ’•β€

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Daphny Aqua says:

        There should be consequences for such actions, though you are right they can do much more evil but like the proverbs says ‘As you saw, so shall you reap’. Glad ypu’re doin fine. ❀️❀️❀️❀️

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Yes, that’s what I feared. You’re absolutely right, those who sow good reap good while those who sow evil reap evil. πŸ’žπŸ’šπŸ’žβ€β€

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Daphny Aqua says:

        Hopefully may be all this will come to end someday. πŸ’–

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Yes. It’s even understandable, kids are just always stubborn growing up. Though I’ve never met most of these boys, I’m sure adulthood changed most of their behaviours, and they’re probably doing pretty well in various aspects of life. πŸ’–πŸŒŸπŸ’–

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Daphny Aqua says:

        I really do hope that is the case, you are kind enough to say that of them. We need more of you. πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–

        Liked by 1 person

      6. Sure, I just wish them all the best. Life is terrible and short in this world to wish people, no matter how evil they’ve been in the past, bad luck. Thanks for your kind words, dearest. ❀

        Liked by 1 person

      7. Daphny Aqua says:

        That is true, lets hope life treated them kind. ❀️

        Liked by 1 person

      8. Sure. πŸ’žβ€πŸ’žβ€πŸŒ·πŸ’š

        Liked by 1 person

      9. Daphny Aqua says:

        πŸ€—β€οΈβ€οΈ

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Mike U. says:

    Saved by the bell or divine intervention? πŸ˜€ This was a close shave, Lamittan! Did your teachers not understand that making students prefects put them at risk of retaliation from other students? In the States, we used to have “hall monitors” (I don’t know if this is still a thing or not) who were sort of like the prefects you mention. We didn’t have hall monitors in my school, fortunately, because odds are I’d have been pegged by the teachers to be one of them, which would have increased the already unreasonable level of bullying going on. Glad you escaped the lashing! What high drama and swashbuckling adventure your young self experienced! πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Imagine it, my friend Mike! It was a tough experience for a child. Here, achools still have prefects, only they call them differently these days, titles like captains, presidents, officials and cabinets are dominant, but it’s the same old house πŸ˜„ with a few furnishings. Thanks for your wonderful comments always, buddy.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. guzigoz says:

    Saved by the bell πŸ™‚ Interesting piece

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m pleased you found it interesting, my friend. Thank you so much. πŸ’žπŸ’šπŸ’ž

      Like

  11. so you were a good two shoes Lam reporting on the others and look how cute you were. What a story told and lucky you escaped this horrific whopping saved by the bell! Did you ever get to be friends with those boys in the end? πŸ’–πŸ˜ŽπŸ˜Ž

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Haha… no, we barely walked the same line; they were arrogant and rude, and though I was young, I understood that a good leader did not simply tickle people’s fancy. Haha. But somehow, i loosened my grip to escape their realms of turpitude. I’m certainly happy you liked this, dear. Thanks for your kind words. πŸ’žπŸ’šπŸ’žβ€

      Liked by 1 person

      1. they were bullies in the worst way and you were a leader back then and so young, innocent and smart.
        and a new word for me today … turpitude.
        hooray!!! πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’– welcome always

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Oh so sweet of you to say, dear Cindy! It’s very true, what you just said. You’re so kind and good to associate with. And wow, I’m glad you just found a new word from my comment. Thank you many times for highlighting. πŸ’žπŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’ž

        Like

  12. Obong eno says:

    They should have trashed you a lil😜
    I was in “noise makers company”
    So I know how your mates felt… Lucky you sha

    Liked by 1 person

    1. 🀣🀣🀣 Lucky me they didn’t! Noisemakers were just another funny lot, cause most of them were performing well though. 🀣 Seems to me you were one of those intelligent ones who made noise all the time and read at midnight πŸ˜‚ or those geniuses who who had never seen reading at all and still passed.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Obong eno says:

        Lol…my dear, it was my seat position, I’ve always been a “back bencher”.. I received loads of thrashing for noise I didn’t make. One time, a teacher asked me to move to the front, tried it but felt so uncomfortable sitting in front of people, I had to rush back and the thrashing continued πŸ€—

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Hahaha… ohoo.. it’s humorous how you call it: thrashing 🀣. Well, you were a shy one I guess. I don’t know why teachers always think backbenchers are the most indisciplined? Oh dear, you must have had it rough with the thrashings to have entertained a tough prefect like me. Da! πŸ˜€

        Like

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